Under the sea

The Belize barrier reef is the second largest reef in the world and is protected as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Stretching 190 miles north to south along the Belize coastline, the reef consists of 70 hard coral species, 34 soft coral species, mangrove forests, cayes and atolls; all providing a wide and varied range of habitats for the plethora of species that call this place home.

Unsurprisingly, Belize is a diving paradise and whether you are experienced, or a complete beginner, you will be well looked after. Putting on a snorkel is also a magical experience here and you’ll stand just as good a chance at spotting some of the incredible species.

The reef is home to three endangered species of turtle; loggerhead, green and hawksbill. You are able to spot these turtles all over the Belize Barrier Reef.

Turtle

Manatees, or sea cows as they are often called, can be found living in rivers, estuaries, mangrove forests, lagoons, and shallow waters. You are likely to see them all along the coastline of Belize.

Manatee

A favourite with everyone, dolphins are commonly seen in Belize!

Dolphins

Whale sharks travel 30,000 miles around the world each year and you can witness these incredible animals passing through Belize around the full moon in March, April, May and June.

Whale Shark

The Belize Barrier Reef is home to three species of ray; the southern stingray, the manta ray, and pictured here, the spotted eagle ray.

Eagle Ray